Jac Nott

On getting started in the industry…

“I started playing in a band at school, but could never hear myself when in shows – so took an interest in the reinforcement of sound. I mixed my first gig (under supervision!) aged 14. A few years later, I talked my way into a local recording studio for work experience – starting as tea/coffee maker – moving to tape op then moving up to learning mic techniques, console mixing, Cubase programming. A good day was when you didn’t have to get the soldering iron out to make the pub PA work!”

On her touring origins…

“One of the bands I had covered monitors for on a few one offs (Groop Dogdrill) were supporting to Motörhead in 1998. I asked them if I could visit their first gig and say hi, they replied only if I mixed their monitors for the show – first show would mean PA techs would have little time spare for mixing support the acts. Boom, I was on tour.”

On touring etiquette…

“You need to be a bit of a chameleon. It’s no good being the best engineer or tech in the world if you rile everyone up. You all have to live in close proximity on a bus for long periods of time, and some times show days are really challenging in so many ways. A happy bus is a happy tour. You also have to know when compromises are needed in your world for the bigger picture or better outcome of the show as a whole. One of the most important things is to want to tour!”

On winning (another!) TPi Award…

“Mind boggling! To be nominated is brilliant – it’s an amazing feeling to realise people have noticed you, but to win with all those other great engineers out there is something else! Immense! I really do appreciate all those who put my name forward. I am also really thankful to the bands I have worked with repeatedly over the years; fundamentally they have made me the engineer I am today.”

On passions away from the console…

“Ocean conservation. I am a keen diver (in hotter climates!) and it breaks my heart to see how much rubbish is in the water caused by mankind and how much we are wrecking the oceans with unnecessary, non sustainable antics like shark finning, or poaching ever dwindling populations from designated sanctuaries. These animals all play a huge part in how the ecosystem works, and how oxygen is circulated. The Ocean is (was) a balanced environment so if we mess up the consequences will hit us on land. As a result I spend a fair bit of my spare time supporting and volunteering for Sea Shepherd UK. Sea Shepherd is a global movement dedicated to ocean conservation and preservation, entirely made up of volunteers both on land and at sea all around the world. Ordinary people like you and I who will take (non-violent) direct action where necessary to stop the antics of poachers, illegal whalers, drift net fishing vessels (which was made illegal years ago!) and a whole host of other illegal ocean damaging activities. It is amazing how little people know about ocean damage, and how simple changes we can all make will help hugely.”

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